The Multilingual Mind: lecture series on multilingualism across disciplines – summer semester 2021

The Multilingual Mind: lecture series on multilingualism across disciplines – summer semester 2021

We are pleased to announce the programme of the Lecture series ‘The Multilingual Mind’  for the summer semester.

The lecture series ‘The Multilingual Mind’ will start again on the 13th of April and will run until the 15th of June 2021. The lectures will take place every Tuesday from 17.00 until 18.30 (CEST/UTC+02). This semester they will be hosted by the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Jagiellonian University, University of Konstanz, University Milano-Bicocca, and University of Reading. As in the previous semesters, the speakers will present research findings on multilingualism across different disciplines, in line with the MultiMind project (linguistics, education, psychology, neuroscience, speech & language pathology). The lecture series is aimed at everyone interested in Multilingualism.

Date & time: Tuesdays 17:00–18:30 CET/UTC+01
Platform: Zoom. To attend please register HERE
Programme (You can download the programme here)

13.04.21: Erika Hoff (Florida Atlantic University): Why bilingual development is not easy, but possible
20.04.21: Núria Sebastián Gallés (Pompeu Fabra University): How bilingualism shapes the infants’ mind/brain
27.04.21: Merel Keijzer (University of Groningen): Language learning as a vaccine to promote healthy aging: The linguistic, social and cognitive effects of third-age language learning
04.05.21: Francesca Costa & Maria Teresa Guasti (University of Milano-Bicocca): Double or single literacy in different contexts
11.05.21: Napoleon Katsos (University of Cambridge): Bilingualism in children with developmental disorders: From language and cognition to human rights
18.05.21: Marco Calabria (Open University of Catalonia): How is cognitive neuropsychology contributing to bilingualism research?
25.05.21: Jia’en Yee (University Putra Malaysia): Multilingualism effects on brain structure
01.06.21: Maren Eikerling (IRCCS – Associazione La Nostra Famigli ‘Istituto scientifico Eugenio Medea’): Computerized bilingual screenings of developmental language disorder and developmental dyslexia in bilingual children
08.06.21: Johanne Paradis (University of Alberta): Bilingual development in first generation Syrian refugee children: What factors contribute to successes and challenges?
15.06.21: Dávid György (University of Geneva): Rhythmic priming of syntactic processing: a common structure?
The lecture series is part of the project ‘The Multilingual Mind’ that has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska Curie grant agreement No 765556.

New Approaches To How Bilingualism Shapes Cognition And The Brain Across The Lifespan

New Approaches To How Bilingualism Shapes Cognition And The Brain Across The Lifespan: Beyond The False Dichotomy Of Advantage Versus No Advantage

For much of the twentieth century, bilingualism was thought to result in cognitive disadvantages. But research in recent decades has demonstrated that experience with two (or more) languages confers a bilingual advantage in executive functions and may delay the expression of symptoms in Alzheimer’s disease However, conflicting evidence has emerged, with certain research groups consistently find support for a bilingual advantage, while other groups consistently find none, and this has led to questions concerning the robustness of the advantage claims. Some have even suggested that bilingual advantages may be entirely spurious. A heated debate has ensued, and the field has now reached an impasse. New approaches are needed, that move beyond the traditional perception of bilingualism as a binary variable and take into account the non-static nature of these effects.

This Research Topic seeks to move beyond these entrenched positions. We see an opportunity for ambitious and rigorous studies to advance understanding of how experience with multiple languages interacts with other variables to alter cognition, affect aging, and change the structure and function of the brain. Detailed theoretical models are needed that put forth a priori testable predictions concerning which types of bilingual experiences are more likely to show plasticity effects in a given domain and which are less likely. To achieve this, it is necessary to pay attention to methodological nuances in experimental designs, such as differences in tasks used and in the components of cognition they measure. By focusing on these aspects of research design, we believe that it is possible to systematically advance knowledge of how bilingualism affects cognition and the brain.

Research in the past two decades has shown that the experience of bi/multilingualism can affect language processing, domain-general cognition, and the underlying brain architecture. Nevertheless, the inconsistencies in the evidence, which partly stem from differences in methodologies as well as broad and inconsistent definitions of bilingualism, have meant that the field of bilingualism has been locked in a stalemate over whether bilingualism yields cognitive advantages. In order to advance knowledge beyond the binary of advantage versus no advantage, new approaches are needed that take into account nuanced experiences and individual differences related to bilingualism and that use a variety of innovative methodological techniques. In this Research Topic, we invite ambitious and rigorous theoretical or empirical papers that seek to advance understanding of how experience with acquisition and use of more than one language interacts with other variables to shape cognition and brain structure and function.

We invite submissions using behavioral and/or neuroimaging approaches across the lifespan and studied with cross-sectional or longitudinal designs and we particularly welcome submissions focusing on development and healthy ageing and neurodegeneration. Review articles and meta-analyses of the literature are also welcomed.Keywords: Bilingualism, cognition, lifespan, development, disorder, ageing

Editors
Mark Antoniou, Western Sydney University
Christos Pliatsikas, University of Reading
Scott R. Schroeder, Hofstra University

Submission Deadlines
30 September 2021 — Abstract
31 January 2022 — Manuscript

Full details available here

The Multilingual Mind

‘The Multilingual Mind’ will take place this year online. The lecture series consists of ten lectures on Multilingualism from the perspective of different disciplines (linguistics, education, neuroscience, and speech & language pathology). The series includes lectures by early stage researchers and offers them a platform to present their work to a wider audience alongside senior academics.

Website
Tuesdays 17:00–18:30 CET/UTC+01
Zoom link

3.11.20: Prof Dr Theodoros Marinis (University of Konstanz) & Duygu Özge (Middle East Technical University): How do bilingual children acquire complex syntax in their heritage vs. the majority language: Turkish-English speaking children in the UK

10.11.20: Prof Jeanine Treffers-Daller (University of Reading): Explaining individual differences in Executive Functions performance in multilinguals: the impact of code-switching and alternating between Multicultural Identity Styles

17.11.20: Sarah von Grebmer zu Wolfsthurn, Leticia Pablos Robles and Niels O. Schiller (University of Leiden): Cross-linguistic interference in multilingual speakers – an ERP study

24.11.20: Prof Dr Bernhard Brehmer (University of Konstanz): Age effects in bilingual acquisition: Observations from different groups of Polish-German bilinguals

1.12.20: Prof Ianthi Tsimpli (University of Cambridge): Multilingualism in underprivileged contexts

15.12.20: Michal Korenar (University of Reading): Bilingualism and creativity

12.1.21: Jasmijn Bosch (University Milano Bicocca): Predictive processing and cross-linguistic influence in bilingual children

19.1.21: Dr Maria Luisa Lorusso (IRCCS, Eugenio Medea): Assessment of developmental language and reading disorders in bilingual children

26.1.21: Prof Philippe Prevost (University of Tours): Is growing up with two languages particularly challenging for autistic children?

2.2.21: Prof Li Wei (University College London): Translanguaging: Transforming the way we think and talk about language, bilingualism and education

The lecture series is part of our MA in Multilingualism and is organised by the Department of Linguistics and the Centre for Multilingualism at the University of Konstanz and the project ‘The Multilingual Mind‘ that has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Skłodowska Curie grant agreement No 765556.

PhD positions in Bilingualism, Language and Cognition at UT El Paso

PhD positions in Bilingualism, Language and Cognition at UT El Paso

Iva Ivanova’s Language and Communication Lab within the Bilingualism, Language and Cognition Area at the University of Texas at El Paso Department of Psychology is accepting applicants to the UTEP Psychology PhD program (how to apply). The lab investigates bilingual and monolingual lexical, syntactic and discourse processing with a variety of methods. Current projects are listed here, and lab facilities are described here. PhD students are fully funded with teaching assistantships, research assistantships, and/or fellowships.

The Bilingualism group at UTEP (Consortium for Scientific Research on Bilingualism) has faculty members from several departments with active research programs addressing bilingualism from a multitude of perspectives. PhD students in the Language and Communication Lab can be co-advised by Consortium faculty with compatible interests.

UTEP is a hotspot for research on bilingualism. It is located on the U.S.-Mexico border and offers a unique bicultural and bilingual environment. This makes it easy to recruit Spanish-English bilinguals with a diverse range of experiential and proficiency characteristics, as well as English and Spanish monolinguals from the same community for comparison.

And, El Paso is a friendly place with a unique culture. It is getting hip but still inexpensive, one of the safest US cities, and sunny three hundred days a year.

Interested candidates are encouraged to contact Iva Ivanova (imivanova@utep.edu) for informal inquiries.
Applications must be submitted by December 1st, 2020.

Inviting Applications to the Language Science Doctoral Program at UC Irvine

Inviting Applications to the Language Science Doctoral Program at UC Irvine

The Department of Language Science at the University of California, Irvine, invites applications for Fall, 2021, for our language science doctoral program. UCI is located in Orange County, CA, between Los Angeles and San Diego, and just minutes from the ocean. We are a Department of Language Science that merges the cross-disciplinarity of linguistics, psychology, and cognitive neuroscience with a focus on computational and experimental studies of language development, semantics and pragmatics, syntax, speech, and bilingualism. As the first of its kind in the country, our program provides a new approach to the science of language, enabling exciting opportunities for deep collaboration and cutting edge cross-fertilization. Our aim is to prepare students to be at the forefront of change in the field, empowering them to be the future leaders driving innovation. Our faculty bring expertise in innovative technologies for quantitative, neuroscientific, and behavioral approaches to language science.

We anticipate adding a number of new faculty by Fall, 2021 who will add to existing strengths and contribute to the breadth of our graduate program. Language Science graduate training incorporates curricular flexibility, development of technical communication skills, and prioritization of research early in the graduate career. We welcome applications from students who wish to develop cross-disciplinary collaborations across different faculty research programs. New students will join a cohort of 11 graduate students and two post doctoral fellows.

We encourage prospective students to contact faculty for specific information about their labs or Judith Kroll (judith.kroll@uci.edu), graduate director, for more general information about the program.  The deadline for applications is December 1, 2020.

The core language science faculty include:
Richard Futrell (rfutrell@uci.edu): linguistics, natural language processing, Bayesian modeling, information theory
Gregory Hickok (greg.hickok@uci.edu): neuroanatomy of language, neural plasticity, neuroimaging, cognitive neuroscience
Judith Kroll (judith.kroll@uci.edu): bilingualism, cognition, language processing, cognitive neuroscience
Lisa Pearl (lpearl@uci.edu): language development, linguistics, computational sociolinguistics, cognitive modeling
Gregory Scontras (gscontra@uci.edu): formal semantics, computational and experimental studies of meaning, heritage languages

Affiliated language science faculty include:
Alyssa Brewer (aabrewer@uci.edu): neuroimaging of visual perception, visual deficits, neurological disorders
Brandy Gatlin (gatlinb@uci.edu)language, reading, writing, cultural and linguistic diversity, measurement and assessment, instruction
Young-Suk Kim (youngsk7@uci.edu): Language, cognition, reading, writing, development, bilingual & biliteracy acquisition, dual language learners, English learners
J. Zoe Klemfuss (jklemfus@uci.edu): narrative development; children’s autobiographical memory; sociocontextual influences on children’s narrative, memory, and well-being; children’s eyewitness abilities
Glenn Levine (glevine@uci.edu): applied linguistics, theoretical linguistics, foreign language pedagogy, German-Jewish literature, Yiddish language and literature
Elizabeth Peña (edpena@uci.edu)bilingualism, language impairment, language development, assessment bias and measurement
Rubén G. Rumbaut ( rrumbaut@uci.edu): international immigration, refugee movements, bilingualism and language loss, educational and occupational achievement
Sameer Singh (sameer@uci.edu)large-scale machine learning, information extraction, natural language processing, probabilistic programming, interactive machine learning, distributed & parallel inference, semi-supervised learning
Julio Torres (torresju@uci.edu)heritage and second language acquisition, bilingualism, cognition, task-based language learning, curriculum & instruction
Kai Wehmeier (wehmeier@uci.edu)logic, philosophy of logic and language, early analytic philosophy, philosophy of mathematics

Emeritus Faculty
Virginia Mann (vmann@uci.edu): reading ability, speech perception
Bernard Tranel (bhtranel@uci.edu): linguistic theory, phonology, phonetics, morphology, Optimality Theory, Romance languages, French linguistics, tone languages, Margi, Mixtec

I SIPB: I International Symposium on Prosody and Bilingualism

I SIPB: I International Symposium on Prosody and Bilingualism
Date: 23-Jul-2020 – 10-Sep-2020
Location: Online, Brazil
Contact: Amanda Post

Contact Email: prosodia.biling.simposio@gmail.com
Meeting URL

Linguistic Field(s): Cognitive Science; Language Acquisition; Phonetics; Phonology; Psycholinguistics

Meeting Description: The International Symposium on Prosody and Bilingualism aims at being a space for interesting discussions on methodological and theoretical aspects of experimental research at the intersection between bilingualism, phonology and phonetic studies, especially regarding prosody. The speakers are researchers with different academic backgrounds and from different parts of the world who develop original and innovative works in the area. There will be a lecture per week, every Thursday, from 2PM until 4PM (Brazilian Time). The lectures will be given in three languages: Portuguese, Spanish and English.

Program Information:

23/07/2020
Roberto Ferreira
UC. Chile, Chile
Title: Word learning in bilinguals

30/07/2020
Cristiane Conceição Silva, UFSC, Brazil
Title: Aprendizagem da entoação em espanhol L2: teoria e experimentação

06/08/2020
Vincent van Heuven
U. Leiden & U. Leeuwarden, The Netherlands
Title:Towards resolving the prosody paradox in nonnative communication

13/08/2020
Ricardo Souza, UFMG, Brazil
Title: O que o processamento da linguagem por bilíngues traz para o estudo da aquisição de segunda língua?

20/08/2020
Andries Coetzee, U. Michigan, US
Title: Spanish-Afrikaans bilingualism in Patagonia: how prosodic and segmental effects differ

27/08/2020
Ad Backus, U. Tilburg, The Netherlands
Title: Implications of a usage-based approach to contact linguistics

03/09/2020
Bernat Bardagil Mas, U. California Berkeley, US
Title: A esquerda da oração nas línguas Jê: estrutura prosódica e sintática

10/09/2020
Bjoern Koehnlein, Ohio State University, US
Title: Current issues in word-prosodic typology: The case of word accents

PhD positions at BCBL- Basque Center on Cognition Brain and Language

Funded PhD candidate positions at the BCBL- Basque Center on Cognition Brain and Language (San Sebastián, Basque Country, Spain) www.bcbl.eu
The Basque Center on Cognition Brain and Language – BCBL- (San Sebastián, Basque Country, Spain) is offering a predoctoral position to work on a PhD funded project to investigate the effects of bilingualism on language development in the first years of life. The PhD student will join the Infant Language and Cognition group at the BCBL to work under the supervision of Dr. Marina Kalashnikova.

Application requirements: Applicants should have a Master’s (or equivalent Honours) degree in Psychology, Cognitive Neuroscience, Linguistics, and/or neighboring areas. The applicants must demonstrate excellent written and oral communication skills in English (knowledge of Spanish and/or Basque is not a requirement). Previous experimental experience in developmental research is an asset (but not required).

The successful PhD student will have access to the BCBL BabyLab, which is fully equipped for conducting behavioural and neurophysiological research with young infants and children and has access to an extensive database of monolingual and bilingual families. The student’s responsibilities will include the design and implementation of a research project under the supervision of Dr. Kalashnikova and contribution to the collaborative research activities of the group by recruiting and testing infant participants, analysing behavioural and neurophysiological data, and preparing research reports for journal publication and presentations at national and international conferences. The candidate must have excellent communication skills, be able to interact well with scientific colleagues, and work well both independently and as part of a team. T

he student will receive a stipend of 17.785€ (gross/year).

The BCBL  promotes a rich research environment and provides access to the most advanced behavioural and neuroimaging techniques, including 3 Tesla Siemens PrismaFit MRI scanner, a whole-head MEG system, four EEG labs, a fNIRS lab, a BabyLab,  two eye-tracking labs, and several behavioural labs. The BCBL hosts excellent support staff and research personnel. More information about the BCBL can be found at: https://www.bcbl.eu/

To submit your application, please follow this link: http://www.bcbl.eu/calls, applying for “PhD Infant Language and Cognition group 2020” and upload before September 1st, 2020:

·         A curriculum vitae
·         A statement outlining research interests and motivation to apply for the position (1 page maximum)
·         Two letters of recommendation

For further information about this position, contact Dr. Marina Kalashnikova ( m.kalashnikova@bcbl.eu).

Shortlisted candidates will be invited to an online interview.

____

The Basque Center on Cognition Brain and Language – BCBL- (San Sebastián, Basque Country, Spain) is offering a predoctoral position to work on a PhD funded project to investigate metacognitive functions using real-time functional MRI. The PhD student will join the Consciousness group at the BCBL to work under the supervision of David Soto.

Application requirements: Applicants should have an honours and a Masters degree in Computer Science, Machine Learning, Engineering, Neuroscience, or other relevant area. They must have a strong interest in consciousness and cognition coupled with strong computational skills in Python. Experience with state-of-the art neuroimaging techniques would be an advantage but not required. However, the applicant must demonstrate knowledge and experience in the implementation of machine learning models in Python and a keen interest in mastering neuroimaging methods. The candidate must also demonstrate an excellent knowledge of English both written and oral. The duties of the post-holder will be (i) design and implement psychophysical tasks and neuroimaging protocols, identify improvements and/or propose new analysis pipelines under the supervision of the Principal Investigator (ii) recruiting and testing healthy young adult participants (iii) analysing neuroimaging and behavioural data (iv) writing reports for publication in international reputable journals (v) presenting results at internal lab meetings, national, and international conferences. The candidate must have excellent communication skills, be able to interact well with scientific colleagues, and work well both independently and as part of a team. Excellent coding, analytical and presentation skills are highly desirable.

The student will receive a stipend of 17.785€ (gross/year).

The BCBL  promotes a rich research environment and provides access to the most advanced behavioural and neuroimaging techniques, including 3 Tesla Siemens PrismaFit MRI scanner, a whole-head MEG system, four EEG labs, a fNIRS lab, a BabyLab,  two eye-tracking labs, and several behavioural labs. The BCBL hosts excellent support staff and research personnel. More information about the BCBL can be found at: https://www.bcbl.eu/

To submit your application, please follow this link: http://www.bcbl.eu/calls, applying for “PhD Consciousness group 2020” and upload before September 1st, 2020:

·         A curriculum vitae
·         A statement outlining research interests and motivation to apply for the position (1 page maximum)
·         Two letters of recommendationFor further information about this position, contact Prof. David Soto ( d.soto@bcbl.eu).

Shortlisted candidates will be invited to an online interview.

Fourth International Conference on Language Attrition and Bilingualism (ICLA 4)

The conference will take place April 1st – April 3rd, 2021 at Southern Connecticut State University in New Haven, Connecticut, United States.

Abstracts are accepted through August 1st, 2020Click here to submit a proposal

Plenary Speakers
Dr. Robert Adam, University of Edinburg
Dr. Laura Dominguez, University of South Hampton
Dr. Brian MacWhinney, Carnegie Mellon University
Dr. Monika Schmid, University of Essex

Organizing Committee
Dr. Elena Schmitt, Southern Connecticut State University
Dr. Marisa Ferraro, Southern Connecticut State University
Dr. Monika Schmid, University of Essex
Dr. Anastasia Sorokina, University of Bridgeport

Ma / MSc Student – Indiana State University

Department: Languages, Literatures, and Linguistics
Web Address: https://www.indstate.edu/cas/lll
Level: MA / MSc
Duties: Research,Teaching
Specialty Areas: Applied Linguistics; General Linguistics
Required Language(s): English (eng)
French (fra)
German (deu)
Japanese (jpn)
Korean (kor)
Spanish (spa)

Description:

Specialty Areas: ESL, French, German, Japanese, Korean, or Spanish language teaching

Indiana State University is offering a two-year, fully funded Graduate Assistantship position within the Master of Arts in TESL and Linguistics program. This position includes a tuition waiver and stipend for a graduate teaching or research assistant. We are seeking a candidate who can teach either English as a Second Language (ESL) or a beginning foreign language at the undergraduate level. For language instruction, we require advanced level proficiency in the language of instruction. In the area of foreign language instruction, we are seeking a candidate with one of the following languages: French, German, Japanese, Korean, or Spanish. Special consideration will be given to Indiana residents but applications are open to any interested student.

As a graduate student in the Master of Arts TESL and Linguistics program, you will be a full-time student earning 33 credits (taking a maximum of 9 credits per semester) over 2 years. Our TESL area focuses on the acquisition and teaching of languages, especially English as a second language. Courses include a mixture of hands-on practical teaching and theory. Course offerings in the area of linguistics include applied linguistics, language acquisition, phonetics and phonology, morphology, syntax, sociolinguistics, fieldwork, research methods, and various special topics courses.

Our MA program prepares students for careers in teaching and education, industry, government, and non-profit organizations, as well as continuing study at the PhD level in TESL, Linguistics, Second Language Studies, and related fields. Additionally, our department promotes experiential learning and strives to offer community engagement related to linguistics.
The smaller size of our program allows for high levels of interaction between students and faculty with many opportunities for research projects and involvement in various campus organizations. The department specializes in research related to second language acquisition (Drs. D’Amico and Sterling) and sociolingusitics and dialectology (Drs. Bakos and Jose) and has several ongoing collaborative research agendas with actively engaged students. Several of our recent graduates have presented their work at national conferences such as the American Association of Applied Linguistics and New Ways of Analyzing Variation (NWAV). In select cases, these presentations have led to publications with faculty in academic journals.

To apply please complete the online application found at the web address for applications below.

Your application must include:
1. A resume or CV
2. A personal statement/letter of intent
3. All transcripts from your undergraduate institution(s)
4. A list of three academic references with name, job title, affiliation/school, and contact information for each reference
5. Proof of English proficiency for speakers of English as a second language (i.e. TOEFL, ELS, or IELTS scores) – for full list of acceptable proof of English proficiency see the list at https://www.indstate.edu/cgps/graduate/apply/international-degree-seeking-application
The graduate teaching assistantship will be guaranteed for two years, provided that the student is in good standing and making sufficient academic progress after the first academic year.

Contact Information: Dr. Melanie D’Amico, Graduate Program Director, mdamicoindstate.edu

Applications Deadline: 30-Jun-2020

Web Address for Applications: https://secure.vzcollegeapp.com/indstate/

Contact Information:
Dr Melanie D’Amico
mdamico@indstate.edu
Phone:+1 812-237-2356

THE 45th ANNUAL BOSTON UNIVERSITY CONFERENCE ON LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT – PRÓRROGA

***New deadline!***: We have extended our deadline for abstract submission to June 1st, 2020, 8:00 PM (EST)!

***IMPORTANT***

  1. The organizing committee has decided to move BUCLD 45 to a VIRTUAL CONFERENCE after thorough consideration of the current situation of COVID-19, and the valuable feedback from our BUCLD community. Further information will be announced in due course. Stay tuned!
  2. We look forward to receiving your abstract submission. Please be reminded that the deadline for abstract submission is May 15th, 2020, 8:00 PM (EST). More information HERE.
  3. SLD is not holding a symposium this year. For more information please visit the SLD website.

THE 45th ANNUAL BOSTON UNIVERSITY CONFERENCE ON LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT

NOVEMBER 5-8, 2020

Keynote: Dr. Reiko Mazuka (RIKEN Center for Brain Science)
Plenary: Dr. Adele Goldberg (Princeton University)
Student Workshop: Dr. Michael Frank (Stanford University)
CALL FOR SYMPOSIUM PROPOSALS
We are currently soliciting 1000-word proposals for a 90-minute symposium at the Boston University Conference on Language Development on any topic likely to be of broad interest to the conference attendees.
Proposals should include a list of the participants, topics, and format, and should name at least one organizer. Send submissions to langconf@bu.edu with “Symposium proposal” in the subject line.
DEADLINE: All symposium proposal submissions must be received by April 15, 2020. Symposium decisions will be made by June.
CALL FOR ABSTRACTS
Submissions of 500-word abstracts for 20-minute talks and posters will be accepted beginning April 1, 2020 at: http://www.bu.edu/bucld/abstracts/abstract-submission/
DEADLINE: All abstract submissions must be received by 8:00 PM EST, May 1, 2020 May 15, 2020. Please note this is an earlier deadline than in previous years.
Submissions that present research on any topic in the fields of first, second, and additional language acquisition from any theoretical perspectives will be fully considered.
Abstracts must be limited to 500 words, with up to one extra page for examples, figures, tables, and references (for a total length of no more than two pages). A suggested format and style for abstracts is available at: http://www.bu.edu/bucld/abstracts/abstract-format/
FURTHER INFORMATION
General conference information is available at: http://www.bu.edu/bucld
We encourage submissions from scholars in countries affected by the new travel restrictions. We will arrange remote presentation for accepted abstracts by scholars who are unable to attend for this reason.
Questions? Email us at: langconf@bu.edu.

(Also, if you are planning very far ahead: BUCLD 46 will be held November 4-7 2021.)